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Spirulina fights iron deficiency (anemia)

Anemia (iron deficiency) is a condition that often occurs in seniors. It creates a feeling of weakness and fatigue.

In this condition, you do not have enough red blood cells or hemoglobin in your blood. Hemoglobin is the iron-containing red dye that ensures the oxygen transport in the blood. An iron deficit leads to lower red blood cells in your body.

SPIRU-BOOST fights iron deficit

Spirulina is rich in iron and a possible supplement for improving iron deficiency.  Spirulina is a functional iron nutritive fortifier that can supply intestinal nanosized ironI(source 1).

In a study of the elderly with anemia, spirulina was found to increase hemoglobin and white blood cell count. It showed that the subjects saw a steady increase in average values of mean corpuscular hemoglobin in subjects of both sexes, mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration also increased in male participants (source 2).

It has also been indicated in a study with lab rats that spirulina may be helpful in the treatment of leukemia and anemia caused by lead and cadmium intoxication but further studies on human subjects will be required to confirm this (source 3).


References

Source 1: Gao F, Guo W, Zeng M, Feng Y, Feng G. Effect of microalgae as iron supplements on iron-deficiency anemia in rats. Food Funct. 2019 Feb 20;10(2):723-732. doi:10.1039/c8fo01834k. PubMed PMID: 30664135.

Source 2: Selmi C, Leung PS, Fischer L, German B, Yang CY, Kenny TP, Cysewski GR, Gershwin ME. The effects of Spirulina on anemia and immune function in senior citizens. Cell Mol Immunol. 2011 May;8(3):248-54. doi: 10.1038/cmi.2010.76. Epub 2011 Jan 31. PubMed PMID: 21278762; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4012879.

Source 3: Simsek N, Karadeniz A, Kalkan Y, Keles ON, Unal B. Spirulina platensis feeding inhibited the anemia- and leucopenia-induced lead and cadmium in rats. J Hazard Mater. 2009 May 30;164(2-3):1304-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2008.09.041. Epub 2008 Sep 20. PubMed PMID: 18976856.